UMaine CLAS Advising Center

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Calendar for the Week of 4/14/2014 to 4/20/2014

Course registration for Fall 2014 continues today, and will be ongoing for the next several weeks. If you haven’t done so, be sure to make an appointment with your advisor to discuss your plan for the upcoming academic year. Don’t delay, do it today!

Monday, April 14
Registration for Fall 2014 classes continues today, scheduled as follows:
First Years with 20+ credits- 11am
First Years with 18+ credits- 2pm

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, April 15
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
First Years with 15+ credits-7am
First Years with 12+ credits- 11am
First Years with 10+ credits- 2pm

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, April 16
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
First Years with 7+ credits-11am
First Years with 0+ credits- 2pm

Today in Hauck Auditorium from 4pm-6pm, join guest speaker Mary Doria Russell as she gives this years John M. Rezendes ethics lecture. Her lecture will be titled ‘The Age of Discovery from Spain to Space’ which focuses on the ethics of discovery and other ethical issues brought up in her novel and this year’s Honor’s College Read, “The Sparrow”. Russell will also hold a book signing after the lecture.

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, April 17
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, April 18
ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Sunday, April 20
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

7 Day Plan to Stay Productive

Earlier this week we brought you tips on how to improve your study habits. We all know that these are great in theory, but who can stay productive for an extended period of time without getting at least a little distracted? For those of you who need a little more help focusing, take a look at today’s infographic, the “7 Day Plan to Stay Productive.”

7 Day Plan to Stay Productive

Thursday Tip of the Day

Registration for Fall 2014 is in full swing, and classes are filling up fast. If you haven’t done so already, schedule a meeting with your advisor ASAP!

Guide to Good Study Habits, Part I

By the time the average student reaches college, they have generally had over twelve years of experience in school. That’s probably in the range of 15,000 hours in school, not counting time spent on homework. And that’s well past the 10,000 hours normally required to become an expert on something. So you’d think that a college student should be an expert on going to school, studying, taking tests, and so forth. Unfortunately, that’s often not the case. Many students arrive at college completely unprepared for the rigor of the college experience. Despite all the hours they have logged, they haven’t ever developed solid study skills. This blog will provide some tips on how students can overcome this skill deficit and become successful at studying.

The first thing you’ll want to do is go to class. This might seem very obvious, but unfortunately it’s not. By mid-semester, many courses, especially lower level ones, can witness a 30-40% drop in attendance. That means that on any given day, only 60-70% of students show up for class. Going to class is the single most important thing you, as a student, can do. It gives you a better grasp of the expectations of the professor, a basis on which to begin the process of reviewing the material, and can give you hints as to what to expect on the exams.

Another great way to aid in studying is to participate in a study group. As long as you are focusing on the material and not merely socializing, working in a group can give your study time a serious boost. Check out the following percentages. We retain:

  • 10% of what we read
  • 20% of what you hear
  • 30% of what we see
  • 50% of what we see and hear
  • 70% of what we talk about with others
  • 80% of what we experience personally
  • 95% of what we teach to others

So, when you work together, you are reading, hearing, and seeing the material. You are talking about it with others. And sometimes you are even teaching it to others. That is a massive boost to your retention of the material.

Similarly, read any assignments and do the homework in advance of the class period. By doing this you’ll be more familiar with the material and more able to participate in class discussions about it. And as shown above, talking about something boosts your retention, so being part of the class discussion will greatly benefit you.

The place you study is also very important. As mentioned in a previous post, you need to find a place that will be conducive to studying. Some place that is quiet and free from distractions. Feel free to listen to music if it will help remove noise distractions. Some researchers believe that you should actually find multiple places to study and then alternate between them. Different environments stimulate your learning in different ways, so alternating between locations can provide multiple learning experiences, again boosting your retention.

Make a learning schedule. Figure out when assignments are due and study periodically in advance, putting in time studying daily or every other day well in advance. Don’t want until the last moment or the night before to study. Cramming is all about rote memorization which doesn’t last. Conversely, if you take the time to really learn the topic, spreading out your studying over a period of days, it’ll stick with you, you’ll be learning the material and not just memorizing it. And when you understand the topic, you will be able to do better on exams.

The final study tip may sound slightly counterintuitive: don’t study all the time. Take breaks, socialize, have fun. As this New York Times article mentions, mental concentration is like a muscle that needs breaks. As you push yourself longer and harder, you’ll experience diminished returns. You need to give your mind some rest. During a study session, perhaps stand up and stretch on the half hour. Then get up and walk around for five minutes on the hour. And then, after you’ve put in a few hours, get up and do something else, giving yourself a mental break.

The key to studying is to do it in such a way that you’ll enjoy it. Pulling an all-nighter and cramming isn’t fun. You generally don’t as well and you’ll feel worse for wear. Similarly, studying in front of the TV or other technological distraction (computers, phones, tablets, etc.), will just make you want to ignore the studying and focus on the entertainment. Put yourself in a good environment, work with friends and classmates, and then give yourself a reward when you’re done; you’ll find studying considerably more enjoyable and productive.

Calendar for the Week of 4/7/2014 to 4/13/2014

Course registration for Fall 2014 continues today, and will be ongoing for the next several weeks. If you haven’t done so, be sure to make an appointment with your advisor to discuss your plan for the upcoming academic year. Don’t delay, do it today!

Monday, April 7
Registration for Fall 2014 classes continues today, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 50+ credits- 7am
Sophomores with 45+ credits- 2pm

Pride Week kicks off today with the annual flag raising on the mall at 12pm.
Pride Week: Beyond Binaries

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, April 8
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 40+ credits-7am
Sophomores with 35+ credits- 11am
Sophomores with 30+ credits- 2pm

Pride Week: Comedian Alison Grillo

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, April 9
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 27+ credits-11am
Sophomores with 24+ credits- 2pm

Today by 4:30pm is the last day to withdraw a class and receive a “W” on your transcript. After today, withdrawing from a class will result in a failing grade (“F”).

Pride Week: Smashing the Ceiling/True Colors Concert

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, April 10
Pride Week: No Place for H8, Movie showing: “God Loves Uganda”

Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, April 11
Pride Week: National Day of Silence

ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Sunday, April 13
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

Anatomy of an Outstanding Resume

Spring is now here, which means that undergrads are looking for summer jobs and internships while graduates are looking for more permanent positions. And that means that itís time to get your resume polished up. Today’s infographic will show you how to prepare an outstanding resume to make you stand out above the rest.

Outstanding Resume

Thursday Tip of the Day

Next Wednesday, April 9th until 4:30pm is the last day to withdraw from a class and receive a “W” on your transcript. After April 9th, withdrawing from a class will result in an “F”.

The Importance of Routine

A recent article on the Harvard Business Review got me thinking about the importance of a daily routine to success. In fact, research has shown that, throughout history, the most successful people in their fields, what some might call the geniuses of that field, almost all had daily routines. And interestingly, a number of similarities between these routines show up. So let’s look at those mentioned in the article and see how they might benefit you in your schoolwork and perhaps into your life beyond the university setting.

First up is a workspace with minimal distractions. Distractions keep you from accomplishing what you need to accomplish. They get in the way. So naturally, if you want to be productive, you need to minimize them. Being on a campus with over 11,000 students can pose a problem when you’re trying to minimize distraction, but it is still possible. You begin by finding a place where you can comfortably work. This could be a dorm room or apartment, or a table or study carrel in the library, or table in the Memorial Union, or at a computer in one of the computer clusters on campus. Hopefully it won’t be a place where you’ll be visually distracted. Then, if it’s noisy, you need to block off the sounds. Headphones playing some light music can work well. Just make sure that it’s music that blocks outside noises without distracting you.

The next routine is a daily walk. A daily walk or other exercise is important for multiple reasons. Exercise relieves stress, making you more relaxed and able to focus on the work at hand. It also makes you feel better physically. And, very importantly, it takes your mind off the work you have to do, giving you a mental break. As this New York Times article states, mental concentration is similar to a muscle. Continued mental work causes fatigue and requires a rest, a break from deep thought. And daily exercise is a great way to do that. Your best bet is to set a specific time and place for your exercise. This will create a routine, which is harder to break.

The third routine is an accountability metric. You need to hold yourself accountable to your work. Whether it’s writing a paper or studying for calculus, steady and continuous work is the most effective. And that means you need to put in time regularly, whether daily or every other day or so forth. Create a routine where you set aside a certain amount of time, or pages written, something similar. Once you have accomplished that task, you are free to move on.

Very important is seeing a clear dividing line between important work and busywork. We all have busywork, things like emails or social media postings or phone calls/texts from friends. These may seem important but we know there is a difference between returning that text and studying for that exam or writing that paper. Some people divide the day into times for real work and times for busywork. Others may turn to busywork when real work is going poorly. A good policy is to connect the important work to the previously mentioned workplace with few distractions. When you sit down to work in that good place, put aside the busywork and focus entirely on the important work. Have clear demarcations between the two.

The next routine is somewhat counter-intuitive, to stop when you’re on a roll, not when you’re stuck. We’ve all hit roadblocks in our work and decided to stop at that point. The problem is that the roadblock is often a hindrance to picking up where we left off, and can lead us to procrastinate so that we don’t have to address the difficulty. Conversely, if you stop when you’re on a roll, you will feel energized to pick up where you left off previously, since you know where you are and where you’re going with the work.

Having a supportive partner is less a routine and more an important lifestyle choice. This partner can be a romantic partner or simply a very close friend. But a good and supportive partner can lessen the load on you, help remove stress. They can be an invaluable support, both emotionally and practically. Conversely, a non-supportive partner can hinder your every move, whether by hampering your ability to focus on the important work or accentuating the importance of your busywork, causing you to question your priorities. So, be careful in your partners.

The last routine is to have a limited social life. Perhaps this is important for geniuses, but for the majority of college students, a healthy social life is invaluable. Part of the college experience is learning how to interact socially as an adult, so I strongly urge you not to overly limit your social life. But make it part of your daily routine. It should no more dominate your routine than any other aspect of your day should.

Routines are invaluable in your daily life, as they provide structure and focus to your activities. Always remember, though, that routines should serve you, you shouldn’t be a slave to them. Their purpose is to allow you to accomplish your goals and live a happy, healthy life. Accordingly, learning how to build positive routines in your life today is important for your future life as well.

Calendar for the Week of 3/31/2014 to 4/6/2014

Course registration for Fall 2014 continues today, and will be ongoing for the next several weeks. If you haven’t done so, be sure to make an appointment with your advisor to discuss your plan for the upcoming academic year. Don’t delay, do it today!

Monday, March 31
Registration for Fall 2014 classes continues today, scheduled as follows:
Student Athletes-7am
Juniors with 80+ credits- 7am
Juniors with 75+ credits- 11am
Juniors with 70+ credits- 2pm

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, April 1
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Juniors with 65+ credits-7am
Juniors with 60+ credits- 11am
Juniors with 54+ credits- 2pm

Visit Wells Conference Center today from 8am-5pm to attend the Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase. The event, sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) and open to any undergraduate at the university, will feature presentations from 148 students, consisting of 76 posters, 21 oral presentations or performances, and nine exhibits. The UMaine community and general public are welcome to attend the free event. For more information or to request disability accommodations, contact CUGR Office at 207.581.3583.

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, April 2
Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, April 3
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, April 4
ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Saturday, April 5
Join us today from 10am-2pm at Arthur St. John Hill Auditorium for TEDxUmaine. The first TEDx event on the University of Maine campus, sponsored by the Maine Journal publication, strives to share the experiences of exceptional University of Maine students through their own voices. The event will be comprised of six to eight student speakers as well as selected TED videos from past TED talks and live musical entertainment. The four hour event will include an hour long intermission in which audience members and speakers can eat lunch, network, and share ideas. For more information, visit TED’s website.

Sunday, April 6
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

7 Productivity Lessons from Ants

Have you ever looked at ants and aspired to be like them? Probably not. However, there is a lot we can learn from these creatures that spend their short lives being extremely productive. So, the next time you see an ant, use it as inspiration for all of the great things you can and will do.

7 Productivity Lessons from Ants

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