UMaine CLAS Advising Center

Helping UMaine students achieve success. It's what we do.

Calendar for the Week of 11/24/2014 to 11/30/2014

Monday, November 24
The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  
Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
12pm-1pm – MAT 115
2pm-4pm – PHY 122
4pm-5pm – PSY 100
5pm-7pm – MAT 228

Every Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table

Tuesday, November 25
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
11am-12pm – CHY 121
2pm-3pm – SMS 100
4pm-6pm – BIO 100

Wednesday, November 26
Thanksgiving break begins today and goes until Sunday, November 30th. Have a safe and relaxing vacation!

College Study Habits

We all know the popular saying about needing to study at least two hours a night, and what types of resources you should look for when researching online (not Wikepedia!). But do you know what professors think about all of this? Find out with today’s infographic:

Study Habits and Where to find help

Thursday Tip of the Day

If you are struggling financially and are looking for options to help pay your bill, be sure to visit the Student Financial Aid office in Wingate Hall- they have all sorts of resources to help you get rid of those fees!

How to Choose a Minor

You’ve started college. You’ve chosen a major. You’re all set. But then someone blasts your equilibrium and asks, “What’s your minor?” That sets your mind working, making you start wondering if you really need a minor. And if the college doesn’t require one, should you bother having a minor? And if so, what should it be. Well, hopefully this post will help you wade through some of those very legitimate questions and provide you with some guidance on whether to have a minor field, and if so, how to choose it.

A minor field is an area of study that provides a basic grounding in an academic field. Here at UMaine, most are between 18 to 24 credit hour. That’s normally 6-8 classes, about ½ to ⅓ of the credits required for most majors. A minor won’t make you an expert, but if gives you a general understanding of the field. This general knowledge, though, can be important academically or professionally, or even in both ways.

First off, do you NEED a minor? While the University of Maine does not require students to have a minor, certain colleges and programs do. As an example, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences (CLAS) requires a minor for students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts and who matriculated effective Fall 2011. So you’ll want to check with your advisor to see whether your particular major or your college does require one.

One way to choose a college minor is to think ahead to possible career paths you’d be interested in pursuing. Often a major is chosen to provide a direct path to that career. But sometimes a little more knowledge or a little more training is necessary or beneficial to achieve your career goals. That’s where a minor comes in. A minor can complement your major field, giving you a broader base to work from when you hit the job market or look into going to graduate school. For instance, there are a number of Psychology majors here in CLAS that are minoring in Neuroscience, providing them with a background in both the psychological and physiological aspects of the human brain. Another popular option, for students interested in going to law school, is to major in Political Science or History or even Philosophy and minor in Legal Studies. Students then gain the analytical and critical thinking skills that the liberal arts provide, plus a contextual background for the legal profession.

A minor can also complement the major in terms of career goals, while being quite different from the minor. A student interested in pursuing a career in marketing could choose a Business Administration in Marketing major and a minor in Graphic Design. Or perhaps a future software design engineer might major in Computer Science and minor in Accounting, providing that student with an understanding of the needs that business field needs in its software. Future K-12 teachers should also not underestimate the importance of a minor field in expanding teachable subject areas.

Of course, a minor does not have to help you towards your chosen career path. Not at all. For some students, a minor field is simply a subject that the student really enjoys and is passionate about. Let’s be honest, college is expensive and few people have the time and money required to obtain degrees in every subject they love. While your primary passion should be your major, if there’s another topic you feel strongly about, minor in it. The University of Maine has over 100 different minor programs, so there is likely one that will fit your passion. Students can theoretically have as many minors as they’d like (I say theoretically because time and money limit the vast majority of students to one or perhaps two minors). And while having a minor doesn’t have to be chosen to help your career, it can definitely demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and experience that can help you stand out from the crowd.

So, choosing a minor field is an intensely personal decision. Some students will choose the minor based on career paths, others for personal edification. Both are completely legitimate choices. If you find that you are having difficulty deciding on a minor, we here at the CLAS Advising Center can help you look through your options. Also talk with your faculty advisor about complementary fields. And don’t forget that the Career Center is an excellent resource and they can help you examine potential minor fields as well. But in the end, the choice is yours. Don’t let anyone choose it for you.

Calendar for the Week 11/17/2014 to 11/23/2014

Monday, November 17
The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  
Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
12pm-1pm – MAT 115
2pm-4pm – PHY 122
4pm-5pm – PSY 100
5pm-7pm – MAT 228

Every Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table

Tuesday, November 18
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
11am-12pm – CHY 121
2pm-3pm – SMS 100
4pm-6pm – BIO 100

Wednesday, November 19
Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
9am-10am – PHY 121
10am-11am – AST 109
11pm-12pm – SMS 100
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – PHY 121
4pm-5pm – PHY 111

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table

Thursday, November 20
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
10am-11am – CHY 121
1pm-2pm – MAT 232
3pm-4pm -PSY 100
4pm-6pm – BIO 100

ML&C
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

How to Research

Do you have a big paper that is due soon? Or maybe you need to do some research to prep for an exam or group project? Either way, today’s infographic keys you in to some websites that you may not be aware of- as well as some you didn’t know could be used for research.

How to Research

Thursday Tip of the Day

Tomorrow, Friday November 14th, by 4:30pm is the last day to withdraw from a class and receive a “W” on your transcript. After tomorrow, withdrawn classes will receive a failing grade.

“Should I Study Abroad?”

A topic that comes up often in advising meetings is whether a student should study abroad. Doing so is something that many students think about, and every year between 120 and 150 University of Maine students actually go through with it. Typically, if a student asks for my input, I tell them that if they want to go abroad and can afford it, they should do so. That, of course, is a rather simplistic response. But here’s some legitimate reasons why studying abroad is a great idea.

1) Probably the best reason to study abroad is that the experience will broaden your horizons and your perspective of the world. It’ll open you up to different ways of thinking and acting, helping you to examine differing values and beliefs. Few students come back from their study abroad experience the same person they were then they left. Most come back with greater maturity, greater self-confidence, and greater ability to tolerate and deal with ambiguity.

2) Another important reason to study abroad is that it provides you with the opportunity to travel. First, you’ll be going to another country, another culture. You’ll be experiencing that daily. But then during weekends and breaks, you’ll be able to travel and explore the region, seeing even more of the differing culture. For most students, studying abroad is the best and easiest way to travel overseas. It’s an opportunity that many students may never have again.

3) Studying abroad is also a great way to learn a new language. Immersion into a language and culture is the most effective method of learning possible. Being in a foreign land, surrounded by other students and faculty and everyday people who are speaking the language of the country you are in will force you to learn to speak that language. And being multilingual is great for both personal and career growth.

4) Studying abroad will give you skills that translate into those skills future employers are looking for. Being alone in another country, you will be forced to take responsibility for yourself. So, in addition to gaining practical knowledge about a specific culture and language, you’ll be more apt to be able to creatively problem solve and to adapt to diverse cultural experiences. You’ll have learned leadership skills. And most likely, you’ll have demonstrated strong listening and communication skills.

5) Studying abroad will also make you more employable. Why? Well, only about 4% of U.S. students study abroad. Yet with the world becoming more globalized, American corporations are looking for students that have global experience. Studying abroad puts you in a position to stand out from the crowd.

There are, of course, many other reasons to study abroad. You may have others of your own to add to these five. Whatever your reasons are, I will say it again, I highly recommend that you study abroad if you’re interested in doing so. So, contact the Office of International Programs. Talk to a peer advisor about locations and the experience. Check out how study abroad relates to your major. Find out about finances and financial aid. And most of all, have fun.

Calendar for the Week of 11/10/2014 to 11/16/2014

Week of Events to Honor Veterans
The University of Maine will recognize veterans with a week of ceremonies, presentations, and panel discussions. The activities, which are coordinated by the UMaine Office of Veterans Education and Transition Services (VETS) and UMaine Veterans Association, will begin Monday, Nov 10 at noon with an opening ceremony on the mall.

Monday, November 10
The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  
Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
12pm-1pm – MAT 115
2pm-4pm – PHY 122
4pm-5pm – PSY 100
5pm-7pm – MAT 228

Every Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table

Tuesday, November 11
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
11am-12pm – CHY 121
2pm-3pm – SMS 100
4pm-6pm – BIO 100

Wednesday, November 12
Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
9am-10am – PHY 121
10am-11am – AST 109
11pm-12pm – SMS 100
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – PHY 121
4pm-5pm – PHY 111

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table

Thursday, November 13
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
10am-11am – CHY 121
1pm-2pm – MAT 232
3pm-4pm -PSY 100
4pm-6pm – BIO 100

ML&C
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table

Friday, November 14
Today by 4:30pm is the last day to withdraw from a class and receive a “W” grade. Classes withdrawn after this date will receive a failing grade.

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

LinkedIn for College Students

Have you heard of the social networking site LinkedIn? Today’s infographic gives five reasons why it is one of the most valuable online tools for college students:

Linkedin for College Students

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