UMaine CLAS Advising Center

Helping UMaine students achieve success. It's what we do.

Month: November, 2013

My Writing Center Experience

I am currently a doctoral student and so I’m writing my doctoral dissertation, a long work that will eventually comprise multiple chapters. I decided that I wanted to take the chapter I’m currently working on over to the University of Maine Writing Center. Writing is hard work, even for good writers. Having a second set of eyes read over your work can only help. Someone else can bring a different perspective to the content and is likely to see things in the writing that you might not. Having previously worked with a graduate student in English who focused on Composition and Rhetoric, I had every faith in their ability to help me grow as a writer.

The first thing I did was go to their website and check out the FAQ. There I learned that they offer hour long appointments; that I would be working collaboratively with a Writing Center tutor; that they will help at any stage of the writing process, from the note and outline stage to the final draft; that each of the tutors are hand-picked and have taken ENG 395 in preparation for their position as a tutor. All this looked good, so I decided to schedule an appointment.

The Writing Center utilizes an online scheduling tool to make picking a time and tutor easy. First I had to create an account, so I went to the account creation page. They wanted some basic information: my name, where I am at in my program, and a password. Easy enough. I was then able to use their online booking system. I clicked on that link, signed in, and saw a weekly calendar, with the names of the tutors who were available on each given day with their availability. Here’s a sample screen shot:

Writing Center Screen Shot

The white blocks mean that time is open, blue means it’s booked, and it shows yellow for a time that you have already reserved. But with all the available tutors, I wanted to check out which tutor I could work with.

One of the pages in their site is About the Tutors. This page gives a brief bio of each of the tutors, allowing you to decide if any particular tutor would work best with what you’re doing. Though they are all well trained, personality is still important. Looking through the bios, I found that the majority are English majors or are double majoring, with English as one of the two. Not surprising, really. Being that I am working on my dissertation, I decided that I would start by meeting with the Tutor Coordinator, Megan Bishop, who is a graduate student studying Composition and Rhetoric. I went back to the schedule, found a time with Megan that fit, and I was ready to go.

The day of the appointment came and I showed up with 25 pages. Not quite the entire chapter, but I figured more than enough. Turns out I was right, but we’ll get to that later. The Writing Center is on the fourth floor of Neville Hall, and I got there a few minutes early. I was warmly greeted by one of the other tutors and was told that Megan would arrive shortly. She did and we got started.

To begin with, she asked me about my project, asking specific questions about the overarching dissertation topic, about the subject of this specific chapter, and about specific concepts that I address throughout the dissertation, including in this chapter. Let me just add here that over time a dissertation topic will naturally evolve, and what you start with is rarely what you end with. Thus having to articulate the topic and the different concepts to a non-historian forced me to clarify for myself exactly what I’m working on. I had to be specific and not use technical jargon. This allowed me to frame the topic in a way I hadn’t previously and which brought it into focus.

Once Megan had a handle on the topic, she had me read the paper aloud for about 20-25 minutes, about 12-13 pages worth. She instructed me to listen to what I was reading, paying attention to the flow and to make notes of any places that felt awkward. Reading aloud is something I’ve done for years, but reading to another individual made me hyper-sensitive to the flow of words and sentences and to areas of the paper that were, perhaps, a bit off-topic. All the time I was reading, she was also taking notes that she referred back to in our subsequent discussion.

After I finished reading, Megan provided some initial feedback (such as: I tend to use long, complex sentences with numerous clauses) and then asked that I go through each paragraph and put a note in the margin stating what each paragraph was about. The point of this was to see how each paragraph led into the next. This also would point out any extraneous paragraphs that might have interesting information but that may not contribute to the overall thesis of the paper. However, before we got going on the paragraph notes, we ended up discussing the thesis of the paper and how I articulated it in the first paragraph. Megan and I then spent quite a bit of time going over the wording of the thesis sentences, making sure that it clearly conveyed to the reader exactly what I was trying to convey.

As our meeting was drawing to a close, Megan made it very clear that I was welcome to come in as often as I’d like to discuss my writing; weekly was fine, as was twice a week or even more. Megan had mentioned that the schedule for the week tended to be open on Monday mornings, but by Tuesday midday it would be mostly full. Sure enough, when I looked at the schedule on Tuesday afternoon it was almost entirely full.

I was completely satisfied with my visit to the Writing Center. The entire experience was very welcoming. Everyone was warm and helpful. I gained excellent feedback on my work and also learned effective methods to incorporate into my own writing routine to make my writing stronger. Needless to say, I scheduled meetings with Megan out through the end of the semester and I look forward to more input.

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Calendar for the Week of 11/25/2013 to 12/1/2013

Monday, November 18

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom). Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-11am – FSN 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12pm-1pm – POS 100
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
3pm-5pm – BMB 207
5pm-7pm – BIO 100
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

Every Monday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages. It located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.

12pm-1pm – French Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
1pm-2pm – Japanese Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
4pm-5pm – Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 19
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
8am-10am – Tutor Program – Study Skills Help Sessions
11am-1pm – COS 140
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – PSY 241/245
3pm-5pm – BIO 100
6pm-7:30pm – PSY 100

ML&C:
12pm-1pm – Russian Table – Bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Wednesday, November 20- Sunday, December 1
Thanksgiving break… No academic activities.

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great Thanksgiving break!

Doing Well in School: It’s More Than Just Your IQ

We have all heard of IQ, but how many college students are aware of the importance of emotional intelligence (EQ)? When it comes to happiness and success, in school and in life, emotional intelligence matters just as much as intellectual ability. Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, use, understand, and manage emotions in positive ways. This can help you to relieve stress, communicate effectively, empathize with others, overcome challenges, and head off conflict. Even if you are not aware of it, you employ emotional intelligence many times throughout your daily life, and it influences the way you behave and the way you interact with others.

If you posses high emotional intelligence you can easily recognize your own emotional state and the emotional states of others. You probably engage with people in a way that draws them to you. This understanding of emotions helps you to relate better to other people, form healthier relationships, and achieve greater success at work and school. If you struggle with emotional intelligence you may find yourself feeling misunderstood, making unwise decisions that lead you off course in your life, act impulsively or irrationally, or even experience boredom and anxiety.

It’s not always the most intelligent people who are the most successful or most fulfilled in life. You probably know people who are brilliant and yet socially inept and unsuccessful at work or in their personal relationships. Intellectual intelligence isn’t enough on its own for you to be successful in life. Sure your IQ can help you get into college, but it’s your EQ that will keep you here as you learn to manage the stress and emotions that confront you in your new life on campus.

Daniel Gorman, author of the book Emotional Intelligence, has identified four components that contribute to emotional intelligence. The first two are personal and have to do with recognizing and managing your own emotions while the second two are social and have to do with recognizing and managing emotions in others.

1. Emotional Self-Awareness – This is the ability to know your own feelings in the moment. This is the foundation of emotional intelligence. If you are aware of how you are feeling and why, you will be better able to make effective positive decisions. For instance if you are feeling down and don’t know why you might turn to food or television as a distraction. If you are aware that you feel down and not just hungry or bored you can better deal with the situation.

2. Emotional Self-Management – This is the ability to manage strong feelings. People who are skilled at this avoid making critical decisions at times of intense emotions. They wait till the inner storm has calmed before they make a choice that may negatively impact their lives. For instance, emotional self-management may help you to resist dropping a class simply because you are angry with the teacher.

3. Social Awareness – This skill helps you to accurately empathize with others’ emotions. Empathy is a fundamental “people skill.” For example social awareness can help you recognize and offer comfort or advice when someone is angry, anxious, sad, etc.

4. Relationship Management- This allows you to manage relationships with others. If you are tuned in to what others are feeling you are less likely to say things that embarrass or cause them anxiety. The art of relationship management depends on skills such as listening, conflict resolution, cooperation, and an awareness of the feelings of others.

The good news is that emotional intelligence can be learned at any time in life. Start by becoming more aware of your own emotions. Learn the names of emotions you might be feeling. How many can you name other than anger, fear, sadness, and happiness? Be aware of your emotions as they are happening. There are sometimes very subtle differences between sadness and depression, so the more heightened your awareness is the better able you will be to understand yourself. Look behind the emotion to see what is causing the feeling. And lastly, recognize the difference between a feeling and a resulting action. Feeling an emotion is one thing, but acting on it is another. You have the choice to act in a way that enables you to reach your goals and dreams. Developing emotional intelligence will fuel your motivation to help keep you going forward.

Thursday Tip of the Day

Any and all students who have their registration pin are now able to enroll in classes for the spring semester!

Campus Engagement: A How-To Guide

It is a known fact amongst college and university administrators that engagement in the campus community leads to better grades and more college success, since students that are actively involved in the campus community tend to be happier within themselves as well as happier and more positive about their college choice. Campus involvement can take many forms, such as clubs and organizations, fraternities or sororities, intramural and intercollegiate sports, music ensembles, and student government. Of course, campus engagement is about more than just grades and happiness.

Students who get involved with campus activities experience many benefits. First off, you’ll be meeting people with similar interests, regardless of major. You’ll also be able to discover and explore new activities or areas of interest. You’ll meet many new people, diversifying your experience on campus and helping you build a strong network of friends. In the process, you’ll be gaining interpersonal communication skills, which are important for your life as well as your resume. And it’ll help you find your place on the campus. On a campus of near 11,000 students, that’s very important.

At last glance, the University of Maine has over 200 active clubs and organizations. These range from the Sustainable Agriculture Enthusiasts to the Paranormal Investigation Club to Alpine Ski Club. Virtually any topic you can think of has a home in a club or organization here on campus. There are a few different ways to get a club’s contact information. The student government website contains complete list of recognized clubs, which contains names and emails. We keep a hard copy of that list on file in the Advising Center. Many clubs put up fliers around campus, especially in the Memorial Union, that contain contact information. There is also a FirstClass folder that contains all of the club folders. To get there, open the Student Resources folder on your FC desktop, then open UMaine Community, then Group & Organizations, then UMaine Student Organizations, and then finally, UM Student Groups. You’ll see the FC folder for every club on campus. Feel free to peruse the messages and find out about the club before you get involved.

Many students find involvement in sports beneficial for both mind and body. There are a number of clubs that are sports related and the list can be found here. Campus Recreation also hosts many intramural sporting events throughout the year, with a complete list found here. If you’re interested in getting involved in intercollegiate sports, check out the UMaine Athletics website for more information.

Student government is another excellent way to get involved on campus. In addition to meeting new people from all majors and colleges, you will gain valuable leadership and decision-making skills as well as how to work in a group setting. On their website, you can find out the current officers plus how to get involved.

There are a number of different musical ensembles that students can participate in. These include chamber music, bands, choir, jazz, opera, and the University Orchestra. Though these are run through the School of Performing Arts, students from all majors and colleges are encouraged to participate.

Most students who get involved in campus activities find that it makes their college experience richer and more fulfilling. Though they are busier, their grades increase and their happiness level goes up. We here at the CLAS Advising Center strongly urge each and every student to look at all the opportunities and get involved. Go out and have fun!

Calendar for the Week of 11/18/2013 to 11/24/2013

Just a reminder that Course Registration is ongoing. If you haven’t made an appointment with your advisor yet, you should do so. Don’t delay, do it today.

Monday, November 18
Registration for Spring 2014 classes begins today, scheduled as follows:
First-Years with 20+ credits – 11am
First-Years with 18+ credits – 2pm

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom). Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-11am – FSN 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12pm-1pm – POS 100
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
3pm-5pm – BMB 207
5pm-7pm – BIO 100
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

Every Monday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages. It located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.

12pm-1pm – French Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
1pm-2pm – Japanese Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
4pm-5pm – Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 19
Registration for Spring 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
First-Years with 15+ credits – 7am
First-Years with 12+ credits – 11am
First-Years with 10+ credits – 2pm

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
8am-10am – Tutor Program – Study Skills Help Sessions
11am-1pm – COS 140
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – PSY 241/245
3pm-5pm – BIO 100
6pm-7:30pm – PSY 100

ML&C:
12pm-1pm – Russian Table – Bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Wednesday, November 20
Registration for Spring 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
First-Years with 7+ credits – 11am
First-Years with 0+ credits – 2pm

There will be a presentation in third floor of the Union today from 11am-12:15pm on Careers in the Foreign Service. Come listen to Foreign Service Officer Evyenia Sidereas speak about career opportunities with the State Department. You can check out this flyer for more information. All are welcome!

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – SOC 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12-pm-1pm – MAT 115
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table – Feel free to bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Thursday, November 21
Interested in studying abroad in Canada? The Killam Fellowship Program is offering a scholarship worth $5000 for a student to study in any Canadian college of their choice. Stop in today at the Bumps room in the Union from 2-3pm for an informational webinar, or go to the Killam Fellowship Program website for more information.

Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-10am – MAT 126/127
10am-11am – SOC 101
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – MAT 115
3pm-5pm – BIO 100

Friday, November 22
Drop-in Tutoring for Friday:
9am-10am – PSY 100
10am-12pm – FSN 101
12pm-2pm – PHY 121/122

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

Study Abroad: Why You Should Do It

A topic that comes up often in advising meetings is whether a student should study abroad. Doing so is something that many students think about, and every year between 120 and 150 University of Maine students actually go through with it. Typically, if a student asks for my input, I tell them that if they want to go abroad and can afford it, they should do so. That, of course, is a rather simplistic response. But here’s some legitimate reasons why studying abroad is a great idea.

1) Probably the best reason to study abroad is that the experience will broaden your horizons and your perspective of the world. It’ll open you up to different ways of thinking and acting, helping you to examine differing values and beliefs. Few students come back from their study abroad experience the same person they were then they left. Most come back with greater maturity, greater self-confidence, and greater ability to tolerate and deal with ambiguity.

2) Another important reason to study abroad is that it provides you with the opportunity to travel. First, you’ll be going to another country, another culture. You’ll be experiencing that daily. But then during weekends and breaks, you’ll be able to travel and explore the region, seeing even more of the differing culture. For most students, studying abroad is the best and easiest way to travel overseas. It’s an opportunity that many students may never have again.

3) Studying abroad is also a great way to learn a new language. Immersion into a language and culture is the most effective method of learning possible. Being in a foreign land, surrounded by other students and faculty and everyday people who are speaking the language of the country you are in will force you to learn to speak that language. And being multilingual is great for both personal and career growth.

4) Studying abroad will give you skills that translate into those skills future employers are looking for. Being alone in another country, you will be forced to take responsibility for yourself. So, in addition to gaining practical knowledge about a specific culture and language, you’ll be more apt to be able to creatively problem solve and to adapt to diverse cultural experiences. You’ll have learned leadership skills. And most likely, you’ll have demonstrated strong listening and communication skills.

5) Studying abroad will also make you more employable. Why? Well, only about 4% of U.S. students study abroad. Yet with the world becoming more globalized, American corporations are looking for students that have global experience. Studying abroad puts you in a position to stand out from the crowd.

There are, of course, many other reasons to study abroad. You may have others of your own to add to these five. Whatever your reasons are, I will say it again, I highly recommend that you study abroad if you’re interested in doing so. So, contact the Office of International Programs. Talk to a peer advisor about locations and the experience. Check out how study abroad relates to your major. Find out about finances and financial aid. And most of all, have fun.

Employing Lifelong Learning

Some students think that once they graduate from college they will be done with studying and learning, but in all reality a diploma is just a stepping stone towards your future. Your education will continue as you move along through your life. In the workplace this education can include learning new hard skills such as mastering a new computer system or learning government regulations. You have the opportunity to continue learning as long as you are willing and open to it. Smart students and employees take full advantage of the opportunity to learn from every experience they have. Remember, employers are looking for employees who display a commitment to lifelong learning and the ability to adapt to new challenges.

So, what exactly is lifelong learning? One useful definition is that it is a pursuit of knowledge and education that is continuous, voluntary, and is largely self-motivated for either professional or personal reasons. Learning is not confined to the classroom, but takes place in a wide range of places and it does not stop once you graduate. Why is this important?

Well for starters you can earn more during your lifetime if you are committed to lifelong learning. A few decades ago you might have finished college and had all the education you would need for the rest of your career, but you don’t have that luxury in today’s job market. In a previous post, we pointed out how you need to gain work experience while in school in order to be marketable. Similarly, in order to stay marketable, you need to continue gaining educational experience while working. Skills that were cutting edge just a few years ago are likely out of date. If you want to stay competitive in today’s job market and potentially earn more money, you need to embrace lifelong learning. Not only will this make you a more open minded and interesting person, but scientific research reveals that a challenged, stimulated brain may well be the key to a vibrant life as you age. Embracing lifelong learning will also help you adapt to change easier and even help you find meaning in your life as you graduate and move forward into the “real” world. How do you begin you ask? Good question.

Start by fostering a growth mindset, seek out opportunities to involve yourself in activities and environments that allow you to experience the excitement of education. Tap into your creative potential, and engage in a broad range of subjects such as the arts, sciences and history. Take a look at the general education requirement here at UMaine; these requirements are designed to help to foster that diverse knowledge base. General education classes provide you with an opportunity to explore a subject you may not have ordinarily thought of and explore something outside your normal interest area.

The University of Maine has a Division of Lifelong Learning here on campus and its mission is to “promote learning as a continuous and lifelong process and to provide experiences that enhance quality of life, empower individuals and organizations, improve professional practice and foster global understanding throughout Maine and beyond.” Visit the their webpage and take a tour to see what resources might help you in your quest to embrace lifelong learning. It’s is never too early to begin your adventure!

Calendar for the Week of 11/11/2013 to 11/17/2013

Just a reminder that Course Registration is ongoing. If you haven’t made an appointment with your advisor yet, you should do so. Don’t delay, do it today.

Monday, November 11
Registration for Spring 2014 classes continues today, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 50+ credits-11am
Sophomores with 45+ credits- 2pm

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom). Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-11am – FSN 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12pm-1pm – POS 100
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
3pm-5pm – BMB 207
5pm-7pm – BIO 100
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

Every Monday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages. It located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.

12pm-1pm – French Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
1pm-2pm – Japanese Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
4pm-5pm – Chinese Table

Tuesday, November 12
Registration for Spring 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 40+ credits- 7am
Sophomores with 35+ credits- 11am
Sophomores with 30+ credits- 2pm

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
8am-10am – Tutor Program – Study Skills Help Sessions
11am-1pm – COS 140
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – PSY 241/245
3pm-5pm – BIO 100
6pm-7:30pm – PSY 100

ML&C:
12pm-1pm – Russian Table – Bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Wednesday, November 13
Registration for Spring 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Sophomores with 27+ credits- 11am
Sophomores with 24+ credits- 2pm

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – SOC 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12-pm-1pm – MAT 115
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table – Feel free to bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Thursday, November 14
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-10am – MAT 126/127
10am-11am – SOC 101
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – MAT 115
3pm-5pm – BIO 100

Friday, November 15
Today at 4:30pm is the final date to withdraw from a class and receive a W. After this date, students will receive an F.

Drop-in Tutoring for Friday:
9am-10am – PSY 100
10am-12pm – FSN 101
12pm-2pm – PHY 121/122

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

The Importance of Getting Experience and How to Get It

Everyday I meet with students and I go over some very important topics like their general education requirements and different resources available to them here on campus.  As part of my normal advising routine, I also ask each student about their career goals.  Most have at least a general idea of where they’d like to end up, and then we talk about how to get there.  What I stress, what I reiterate, what I hammer home again and again, is the importance of gaining work experience while in college.  The value of picking up experience in your chosen field while in college cannot be overstated.

The reality is that the days of a college degree setting you apart from the rest of the applicant pool are long gone.  Today, over 30% of Americans over the age of 25 have at least a bachelors degree.  For Americans aged 25-29, that number is even higher, almost 34%.  Over the past twenty years, the value of gaining work experience while in college has skyrocketed.  Numerous reports and studies have appeared over the last few years that show that students that graduate and enter the job market without any experience in their field are at a severe disadvantage.  Some show that a graduate with experience has almost double the chance of landing a job.

When you are working in your field while in college, you are definitely gaining that valuable experience that will help beef up your resume.  That is obviously important.  Equally, or even more important is that you are beginning to build your career and professional network.  If you do good work, you are not only more apt to get a good recommendation, but you are also more likely to potentially be offered a job by the same company after you finish your college degree.

Of course, setting yourself up for success on the job market is only part of the gains you’ll get from working in your field in advance.  Another very important aspect of gaining work experience is it gives you insight into the profession itself.  Many students have a very idyllic view of their careers-to-be, having only read about them or seen them on TV or in the movies. Others may have parents or relatives or friends in that field, and while they’ve heard about the type of jobs available, they may not have seen them up close.  Working in that industry while in college gives you insight into what a job in that field would be like.  Spending time working, seeing the day-to-day activities may well make you realize how much you really want to continue your studies and enter that field.  Conversely, you might find out that the field is not what you thought it would be, which gives you time to reevaluate your major and possible career choice.

But how should you gain experience.  Well, there are multiple paths.  You could find yourself a part-time job that is connected to your field.  Even if it is an entry-level position or seems like menial work and a dead end, it gives you experience.  It’s your foot in the door.  Don’t look down at the lowly positions you might have to work; they show dedication and hard work.  Another possible path is the internship.  While some internships are paid, these days there are so many students looking for internships that many are unpaid.  You are basically volunteering your time.  But again, it’s your foot in the door.  While it may seem as if you are giving your time away for free, the company is providing you with valuable experience.  In some fields, you can also simply be a volunteer.  Many fields are constantly looking for volunteers, from poor relief to humane societies to museums.  These may not be glamorous positions, but their value far outweighs the work you do.

To find these positions, you may have to do some legwork.  You should definitely check with your department, see if they have any listings.  Most do.  Also check with your faculty advisor, see if they have any contacts that they could use to find you something.  The Career Center also has a number of options.  The first and biggest is Careerlink, a database that contains jobs and internships for all majors and is open to all students.  Another is the Maine Mentor Program, which puts you in contact with professionals in your chosen career.  Connections and networking early on can lead to opportunities as you move forward.  And if you’re looking for volunteer opportunities, contact the Bodwell Center for Service and Volunteerism.

So, let me say it again and often.  Get work experience while you are in college.  Don’t wait and think that your college degree is all you need.  Get experience.  Volunteer.  Intern.  Work.  Do whatever it takes, just get that experience.