UMaine CLAS Advising Center

Helping UMaine students achieve success. It's what we do.

Month: January, 2014

Getting Ahead in Business with Body Language

While helping at the Career Fair earlier this week, I couldn’t help but notice the wide range of body language that was on display by both students and employers, with some good and some… not so good. Today’s infographic discusses different types of body language and when to use them. While this is designed for the business world, the lessons you can take from it work in all aspects of your life.

Gengo_body_language_ot

Thursday Tip of the Day

Sign ups for group tutoring has begun and will continue until February 21st. For more info, check out the Tutoring Program’s website.

How to Have a Good Breakfast

The following is the first in a series of guest blogs, written by Katherine O. Musgrave, Professor Emerita of Foods and Nutrition here at the University of Maine. We are thrilled that she has agreed to write these, as nutrition is such an important component of college success. So, without further ado….

Do you feel overwhelmed by all the information about what one should eat to stay well and prevent disease? I have been a Registered Dietitian for 72 years and all I know for sure is that we should eat a variety of foods in moderation, being certain to get adequate nutrients and to have balanced meals. That requires knowing the principles of nutrition, plus how the body uses food. So let’s start with the first principle: “the need for three complete meals per 24 hours.” For many people that means breakfast, lunch and dinner. Each of these meals should consist of three components – a complete protein, a complex carbohydrate, and a fruit and/or a vegetable. The second principle is: meals and snacks should contribute to adequacy, which means having the foods that provide the recommended amount of essential nutrients identified by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. In addition to those nutrients, we are learning of plant substances such as lycopene and flavonoids that contribute to adequacy. In these blogs, I’d like to share some information to assist in following those principles.

To get in the first principle of having three meals per day, breakfast has been designated as the best meal of the day, yet it’s the most likely to be skipped. If you like to sleep until class time, smoothies can be made that include one banana, one-half of a six-ounce container of frozen orange juice concentrate, and a cup of plain or flavored yogurt – all in the blender. Though you may not know it, being half asleep, the carbohydrate in the banana plus the protein in the yogurt and the fruit in orange juice fills the bill of a complete breakfast. If running late, you can drink the smoothie in a paper cup as you race to an eight o’clock class. There are many other fruit or vegetable combinations for smoothies, as well as other foods that can be added, such as cereal and milk. Explore different combinations and find what works for you. Other quick breakfast options include string cheese with an apple and a few whole grain crackers, or a peanut butter sandwich (using whole grain bread) and an orange or pear. Just like the smoothies, there are lots of potential options and combinations. And you can make this happen in the dorm room or at home – it just requires that big word PLAN.

Now there are days when one doesn’t have an early class and can take advantage of the commons or the kitchen. Burritos can be made by scrambling two eggs, adding a sausage link, sliced cheese, and tomato. Combine all of this on a soft corn tortilla and then heat it up for one minute in the microwave. It is both delicious and contains the three components. Although it’s better to eat it at the table with a beverage, it can be eaten on the run; but please chew each bite until it’s liquid before swallowing. Hot cocoa is recommended for its flavonoid content (a phytochemical that is also in dark chocolate), and when made with milk, the hot chocolate additionally gives you calcium, protein and zinc.

If you enjoy cooking on the weekend, making a batch of blueberry muffins offers the possibility of treating friends to muffins and coffee, or you can freeze the extras to pull out and microwave each morning next week. Combining that muffin (complex carb) with cottage cheese (protein) on top of a slice of pineapple (fruit) again meets the standard. What about making a quick serving of French toast (the eggs for the protein on the carbohydrate bread) to be eaten with fruit, such as applesauce or berries? Be sure to use unsaturated oil on the griddle for cooking the toast, such as olive or canola.

So, the next time you start pondering what to eat for breakfast, whether following one of my recommendations or coming up with one of your own creation, remember to make sure that it has the three main components: a complete protein, a complex carbohydrate, and a fruit and/or a vegetable. If you do that, you can’t go wrong. Now looking to the future, we’re going to examine the other two meals (based on that first principle of nutrition), as well as snacks, trying to sort out truths from fiction. See you soon!

Calendar for the Week of 1/27/2014 to 2/2/2014

Monday, January 27
Today until 4:30pm is the last day to drop a class and receive a full refund. After today, you will still be able to receive a partial refund, but will be charged for a portion of the class, even if you drop it.

Signups for Small Group Tutoring at the Tutor Program is ongoing.  The Tutor Program is also offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-11am – FSN 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12pm-1pm – POS 100
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
3pm-5pm – BMB 207
5pm-7pm – BIO 100
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

Every Monday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
1pm-2pm – Japanese Table – Feel free to bring your lunch
4pm-5pm – Chinese Table

Tuesday, January 28
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
8am-10am – Tutor Program – Study Skills Help Sessions
11am-1pm – COS 140
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – PSY 241/245
3pm-5pm – BIO 100
6pm-7:30pm – PSY 100

ML&C:
12pm-1pm – Russian Table – Bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Wednesday, January 29
The Career Fair is today from 10am-3pm at the New Balance Student Recreation Center. The UMaine Career Fair provides an important opportunity for students and employers to meet face-to-face and informally interview for potential jobs and internships. If you are looking for the perfect job after graduation, or just interesting in seeing what jobs are available in your field, stop by and see all the UMaine Career Fair has to offer! For more information, check out the Career Center‘s website.

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – SOC 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12-pm-1pm – MAT 115
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table – Feel free to bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Thursday, January 30
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-10am – MAT 126/127
10am-11am – SOC 101
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – MAT 115
3pm-5pm – BIO 100

Friday, January 31
Drop-in Tutoring for Friday:
9am-10am – PSY 100
10am-12pm – FSN 101
12pm-2pm – PHY 121/122

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

The Afternoon Nap

Introducing: Infographic Friday! Every Friday starting this week, the CLAS Advising Center will post a different infographic addressing various topics related to college life.

Afternoon Nap Infographic

Getting proper sleep is imperative for a college student. In fact, good sleeping habits can be the difference between success and failure in college. Today’s infographic, provided by the Boston Globe, gives some good information about one of the most closely guarded luxuries of the college student: the afternoon nap.

Thursday Tip of the Day

Remember, this Monday, January 27, at 4:30pm is the last day to drop a class and receive a full refund!

Calendar for the Week of 1/20/2014 to 1/26/2014

Even though it is not until next week, remember that next Monday, January 27, is the last day to drop a class and receive a full refund.

Monday, January 20
Happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day! In honor of MLK Jr., there are no classes today.

Tuesday, January 21
Signups for Small Group Tutoring at the Tutor Program begins today.  The Tutor Program is also offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.
Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
8am-10am – Tutor Program – Study Skills Help Sessions
11am-1pm – COS 140
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – PSY 241/245
3pm-5pm – BIO 100
6pm-7:30pm – PSY 100

ML&C:
12pm-1pm – Russian Table – Bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Wednesday, January 22
Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – SOC 101
11am-12pm – AST 109
12-pm-1pm – MAT 115
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
7:30pm-9pm – BUA 201/202

ML&C
12pm-1pm – German Table – Feel free to bring your lunch and join in the conversations

Thursday, January 23
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
8am-9am – CHY 121
9am-10am – MAT 126/127
10am-11am – SOC 101
1pm-2pm – BUA 201/202
2pm-3pm – MAT 115
3pm-5pm – BIO 100

Friday, January 24
Drop-in Tutoring for Friday:
9am-10am – PSY 100
10am-12pm – FSN 101
12pm-2pm – PHY 121/122

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

Taking Classes at Other Colleges or Universities

It happens now and again that a student may need a class that, for some reason or another, isn’t offered here at the University of Maine at a convenient time. Perhaps it’s a class that the student needs to graduate or is a necessary prerequisite for an important class. Perhaps there’s only one section of this class and it filled up quickly. Perhaps the class is just not offered. Or perhaps the student wants to take a summer class, but doesn’t live near enough to Orono to take one here on campus. In such cases or other similar situations, many students will do a Study Away.

Studying away is where you stay enrolled as a degree-seeking student here at the University of Maine, but take one or more courses at another institution. Generally speaking, there are two types of Study Away: you either enroll concurrently at UMaine and the other institution or you enroll only at the other institution. An example of concurrent registration would be a student who is taking courses on campus in Orono but also taking an online course through another institution, typically because the online class wasn’t offered at UMaine that semester. Conversely, if a student lives far from campus, perhaps near Portland, but wanted to take a course over the summer, they could take a course at USM or SMCC and have the credit transferred to UMaine.

How do you go about enrolling elsewhere? Relatively easily, in actuality. First thing you want to do is verify that you are in good academic standing (not on academic probation) and financial standing (not owing any money to any UMaine System Institution). Then, check with your advisor, to see whether he/she agrees that this would be a good course of action (you’re going to need their signature later, so it’s good to get this out of the way early). Next you need to find the appropriate class(es) at another institution. To do that, first go to UMaine’s Transfer Equivalency page. One that page, you can either search for equivalent courses at other institutions (if you know the specific class you are looking for) or you can look at another institution’s courses and find out what their equivalent course would be at UMaine. One thing to keep in mind about the Transfer Equivalency page, though, is that not every class from every other institution is included in the course matrix; only courses that have been transferred to UMaine at one time or another. If you know of a course at another institution that is not on the Transfer Equivalency matrix, check with your college’s dean’s office to find out whether it will work for your needs. After you’ve narrowed down the institution you want to attend and figured out what class you are looking for, so go to that institutions website and search if that class is offered.

If you find an appropriate course at another institution, you then have to register for it. To do that, contact that institution and let them know that you are currently a degree student at the University of Maine, but that you wanted to take a class (or classes) as a non-degree student at their institution. You generally don’t need to go through the full admissions process in that case, though it can vary by institution. If all went well, you’re now registered at another institution. However, that isn’t the end of the process, at least not for the conscientious student.

The point of finding a class through the Transfer Equivalency page was to verify that the course would be accepted here at the University of Maine and if it will fulfill the needed requirements (ie, general education category and such). The worst nightmare for a student doing a Study Away is to finish the course, only to have UMaine not accept it. To prevent that from happening and to facilitate the acceptance of credit, you should fill out a Domestic Study Away Registration form. This same form is filled out regardless of whether or not you are going to be concurrently enrolled at UMaine. Once you have filled out the form (which needs to be signed by your advisor or the department Chairperson), you will submit it to your college’s academic dean. For instance, students with majors in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences would turn in their form to Stevens Hall, Room 100, and students in the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture would turn in their form to the dean’s office in Winslow Hall, Room 2. At the end of the semester, once your final grades are in, be sure to have the other institution send an official transcript to Student Records. As long as you have passed the course with a C- or better (C or better for ENG 101), you’ll be all set and you’ll have another class under your belt and on your transcript.

Studying away isn’t for everyone, but it can be useful to help you get the credits you need in a timely fashion. If you have further questions, check with Student Records or your college’s academic dean’s office.

Dropping, Withdrawing, or Withdrawing from the University: What’s the Difference?

Universities, like any other institution, employ a great deal of jargon. They use terminology to label things that may appear very similar, though have different meanings, however subtle. One case of this is the differences between dropping a class, withdrawing from a class, and withdrawing from the university. Though they sound similar, they each mean something different. Dropping a class and withdrawing from a class are similar, but occur during different time frames. Withdrawing from the university, meanwhile, is a different beast entirely.

The University of Maine defines dropping a course as “a reduction in a student’s class load during the Drop period while remaining enrolled in other classes at any of the University of Maine campuses.” Basically, it means you are removing a course from your schedule of classes during the defined Drop period. Withdrawing is defined as “a reduction in a student’s class load after the Drop period while remaining enrolled in other classes at any of the University of Maine campuses.” Thus, it is basically removing a course from your schedule of classes after the defined Drop period. So what’s the Drop period?

Well, according to the university, it is “the time frame a student may drop classes from their schedule without academic or financial penalties.” So during the Drop period, you can drop a class and either not be charged, if the class hasn’t started yet and you haven’t paid for it, or be reimbursed, if you have already paid for the course (for further information on refunds, check the Bursar’s website). Also, the course is removed from your transcript, with no record of you having ever been registered for the class or attended it. Okay, this is great, but when is the Drop period?

Generally speaking, for standard full-semester classes during the Fall and Spring semesters, the Drop period begins approximately midway through the previous semester, when registration begins, and ends fifteen days into the semester (the number of days equal to the number of weeks the class is scheduled). During this period, students are able to drop classes using the Add/Drop function in MaineStreet. For an example, let’s look at the Drop period for Spring 2014 classes. The Drop period began on Monday, October 28, at 7am, when registration began for graduate students and some seniors. The Drop period then ended on Monday, January 27 at 4:30pm (fifteen days after the semester started, since there are fifteen weeks in the semester). So, if you tried to drop a class on Monday, January 27 at 4:35pm, MaineStreet wouldn’t let you.

Once the Drop period ends, once you have gotten beyond the fifteenth day of the semester, you may still withdraw from a class, at least for the next eight weeks. To do so, however, you have to go to Student Records or, for CLAS students, the Student Services Office in 100 Stevens Hall and fill out an Add/Drop form. The difference is that you will no longer receive a refund. Also, if you withdraw from a class after the first month, you will receive a “W” on your transcript, showing that you attended the course for up to two-thirds of the semester.

Now how about withdrawing from the university? These withdrawals can be either temporary or permanent and entail “withdrawing from all classes at all University of Maine System campuses for which he/she is registered as well as notifying appropriate administrative officials of his/her decision to leave.” Appropriate officials would, again, be either Student Records or, for CLAS students, the Student Services Office in 100 Stevens Hall. Typically, students who withdraw from the university are not entitled to a refund, but under certain extenuating or medical reasons, an appeal may be made. When you notify the correct administrator, check to see if your reason for withdrawing qualifies.

So, while dropping, withdrawing, and withdrawing from the university all mean removing one or more courses from your schedule, the definition and circumstances of each is different, as are the financial and academic ramifications. For more information about the financial ramifications, contact the Bursar’s office. To find out more about how each of these affects your academics, you may contact us here at the CLAS Advising Center, or Student Records, or your College’s Student Services Office.

Thursday Tip of the Day

Just a reminder that tomorrow, January 17, is the last day to add classes. If you are still undecided, better act fast!