UMaine CLAS Advising Center

Helping UMaine students achieve success. It's what we do.

Month: March, 2014

Calendar for the Week of 3/31/2014 to 4/6/2014

Course registration for Fall 2014 continues today, and will be ongoing for the next several weeks. If you haven’t done so, be sure to make an appointment with your advisor to discuss your plan for the upcoming academic year. Don’t delay, do it today!

Monday, March 31
Registration for Fall 2014 classes continues today, scheduled as follows:
Student Athletes-7am
Juniors with 80+ credits- 7am
Juniors with 75+ credits- 11am
Juniors with 70+ credits- 2pm

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, April 1
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Juniors with 65+ credits-7am
Juniors with 60+ credits- 11am
Juniors with 54+ credits- 2pm

Visit Wells Conference Center today from 8am-5pm to attend the Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase. The event, sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) and open to any undergraduate at the university, will feature presentations from 148 students, consisting of 76 posters, 21 oral presentations or performances, and nine exhibits. The UMaine community and general public are welcome to attend the free event. For more information or to request disability accommodations, contact CUGR Office at 207.581.3583.

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, April 2
Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, April 3
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, April 4
ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Saturday, April 5
Join us today from 10am-2pm at Arthur St. John Hill Auditorium for TEDxUmaine. The first TEDx event on the University of Maine campus, sponsored by the Maine Journal publication, strives to share the experiences of exceptional University of Maine students through their own voices. The event will be comprised of six to eight student speakers as well as selected TED videos from past TED talks and live musical entertainment. The four hour event will include an hour long intermission in which audience members and speakers can eat lunch, network, and share ideas. For more information, visit TED’s website.

Sunday, April 6
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

7 Productivity Lessons from Ants

Have you ever looked at ants and aspired to be like them? Probably not. However, there is a lot we can learn from these creatures that spend their short lives being extremely productive. So, the next time you see an ant, use it as inspiration for all of the great things you can and will do.

7 Productivity Lessons from Ants

Thursday Tip of the Day

Just a reminder that registration for Fall 2014 has begun. Be sure to schedule an appointment with your advisor if you haven’t done so already!

Harnessing the Power of the Quadrant

How much time do you spend on tasks that don’t help you reach important goals? How often do you wait until the night before an exam to study? How many times do you let other people’s problems interfere with the things that you need to focus on? Steven Covey’s Quadrant II Time Management System utilizes four quadrants to define specific actions that people take to either further or hinder their success. Understanding these quadrants can help students harness the power of intention as well as organize their time in a purposeful way.

In Covey’s model all actions fall into four categories, depending on their importance and urgency. Actions can be:

  • Important and Urgent
  • Important and Not Urgent
  • Not Important and Urgent
  • Not Important and Not Urgent

Important actions are those which help a student achieve their goals, while urgent actions help to meet deadlines. An action is important if it makes the difference between success and failure. Sometimes things that might appear urgent are not really that important. In order to clarify the differences it will help to have a visual.

Screen shot 2014-03-26 at 12.09.57 PM

Quadrant I represents important and urgent actions that are done at the last minute under the pressure of a deadline. Quadrant II is for important actions done without the pressure of a looming deadline. Quadrant III is for unimportant actions done with a sense of urgency. Quadrant IV actions can waste valuable time, and although these may not necessarily be bad actions, they still do not help achieve goals. Quadrants III and IV are where students who feel they do not have time to study will find the time. Those in Quadrant I are most likely overcommitted in their studies, work, and family time. Quadrant II is where most students should spend their time; this is the most powerful quadrant.

In order to better understand how the quadrants work you can begin by listing specific actions you have taken in the last two days (leave off self-maintenance such as sleeping, eating, drinking, brushing teeth, etc.). For instance:

  • You stayed up into the wee hours studying for an exam the next day
  • You played video games or watched TV
  • You drove your friend to an appointment
  • You talked to your mother on the phone
  • You attended a meeting
  • You went to the gym
  • You began a term paper, etc.

This is how those activities will look in the quadrants:

Screen shot 2014-03-26 at 12.10.46 PM

As you can see the actions in Quadrant II lead to long-term success. While the actions in Quadrant I often lead to anxiety and stress. None of us can always plan ahead, and unexpected things will happen, but the more you focus on those actions which ensure success the easier it will be to free up time to spend with friends or family and even watch an occasional Netflix movie. After all, Quadrant IV might not be the most productive, but it is the most fun.

Calendar for the Week of 3/24/2014 to 3/30/2014

Course registration for Fall 2014 begins today, and will be ongoing for the next several weeks. If you haven’t done so, be sure to make an appointment with your advisor to discuss your plan for the upcoming academic year. Don’t delay, do it today!

Monday, March 24
Registration for Fall 2014 classes begins today, scheduled as follows:
Seniors with 108+ credits-7am

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, March 25
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Seniors with 95+ credits-7am
Seniors with 90+ credits- 11am

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, March 26
Registration for Fall 2014 classes, scheduled as follows:
Seniors with 84+ credits-7am

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, March 27
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, March 28
ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Sunday, March 30
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!

Get More out of Google

Google is widely used in our day to day lives, whether we are trying to remember minor details that we have forgotten (like that actor who played that role in that one movie), answer seemingly random, yet very interesting, questions (like why a unicorn is not called a “unihorn”?), or to look up information on a research topic (because Google is much more reliable than Wikipedia). Regardless of what you use Google for, today’s infographic can teach you how to refine your searches to get the most out of your key strokes.

google

Thursday Tip of the Day

Although sign ups for small group tutoring is over, there is still drop-in tutoring at Fogler Library! Set up an appointment on Synapse, or call the Tutor Program at 581-2351 for more information.

Why Get a Liberal Arts Degree? The Value

In my last post, I addressed the popular misconception that a liberal arts degree will leave an individual poor and destitute. In this post, I want to address another popular misconception, that of job prospects. Popular opinion says that a student needs to major in a STEM field or get a business degree if they want to get a job. After all, looking at the business world, how many companies are really interested in hiring a history major or a sociology major when there are plenty of good business majors to be had? The real answer to that question turns popular opinion on its head.

In 2013, the Association of American College and Universities put out a study, ”It Takes More than a Major: Employer Priorities for College Learning and Student Success.” What this study found is that employers are looking for a range of skills more than they’re looking for a specific degree. The vast majority (93%) of companies felt that the capacity to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems was more important than their undergraduate major. Employers are looking for people who can demonstrate: critical thinking/analytical reasoning, the ability to analyze/solve complex problems, and have effective oral and written communication skills. And they’re looking for people who are innovative and creative.

The reality is that as much as it’s “common knowledge” that businesses are looking for business majors, a survey of articles on business-related websites show what skills these companies are looking for: critical thinking, problem solving, active listening, judgement and decision-making, dependability, communication, and computers. With the exception of computers, these skills are all the primary goals of a liberal arts education. For instance, at the University of Maine, a degree in Political Science teaches students “to think critically about the fundamental theories, principles, institutions, and practices of politics in their social and historical contexts.” Sociology, meanwhile, “helps you develop your skills in written and oral communication, critical thinking and problem solving, and research methods and data analysis,” plus provides knowledge of “social interaction and organizational behavior.” And Communication teaches students to “understand and critically evaluate human communication in their lives and in their careers.”

The fact of the matter is that liberal arts degrees can provide a solid basis upon which individuals can build most any career. First instance, let’s look at the General Management Admission Test (GMAT), which is generally required for admission into graduate management programs, such as MBAs. According to a report by the Graduate Management Admission Council, the undergraduate degrees that produced the top five mean GMAT scores from 2008-2012 were: 1) Physics, 2) Mathematics, 3) Engineering, 4) Other Engineering/Computer Science, and 5) Philosophy. Interestingly, four of the top five are STEM fields and one is a liberal arts degree. The top ten also includes liberal arts majors in Economics and Government. Business degrees in Finance (20th), Accounting (31st), Management (37th), and Marketing (41st) all fall lower on the list than such liberal arts degrees as History (11th), Anthropology (15th), English (16th), Art History (17th), and Political Science (19th). So clearly a degree in the liberal arts is not a drawback if you want to get a job in the business world.

We see a similar phenomenon for individuals taking the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) according to research out of the University of North Texas. Physics and Math take the top spot for average LSAT score, with Economics and Philosophy/Theology tied for second. In fact, seven of the top ten majors and nine of the top fifteen majors are all liberal arts degrees. So a liberal arts degree can actually be very beneficial if you want to go to law school.

So why is there such a common perception that liberal arts degrees are a waste of money? The problem is that students who graduate with these degrees don’t know how to market the skills they have learned. Just learning the skills doesn’t mean that the students know how to translate that ability onto a cover letter or resume. Instead of looking for a job that is looking for an English major, the student with the English degree should instead look for jobs seeking skills they have learned, such as critical reading and writing and communication. Many news articles, such as this one, and this one, and this one, all point to the need demonstrate how you can apply the skills you’ve learned to the career you’d like.

The truth is that a liberal arts degree offers a high degree of career freedom. Rather than learning a vocation, students learn how to learn any skill. They learn how to think and act on their own. Are there going to be reactionary employers who won’t look beyond a college major? Sure, but successful businesses look for skills, and so they will be open to any degree. So don’t fret over the major. But make sure to learn how to use it.

Calendar for the Week of 3/17/2014 to 3/23/2014

Welcome back everyone, we hope you had a wonderful spring break!

Monday, March 17
Classes resume today.

The Tutor Program is offering Drop-in Tutoring, located in the Tutor Program classroom on the first floor of the library (between the Research Consultation Area and the Writing Center classroom).  Check out their website for more information and the full schedule.  

Drop-in Tutoring for Monday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – PSY 100
2pm-3pm -CHY 121
4pm-6pm – BMB 208
6pm-7pm – MAT 232
7pm-8pm – PHY 122

Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday during the semester the Department of Modern Languages and Classics offers the opportunity to practice conversations in other languages.  It is located in Little Hall, Room 207 and is open to anyone who wants to have conversations in the specific language.
12pm-1pm – French Table
12pm-1pm – Spanish Table
12pm-1pm – German Table

Tuesday, March 18
Come by the multipurpose room in the Memorial Union anytime between 11:30 AM and 11:00 PM to see a live stream from Vancouver of TED2014: The Next Chapter sponsored by The Maine Journal! This event is free of charge. To learn more about the TED mission visit TED’s Website, and for a more comprehensive list of speakers and the time when they are speaking visit: TED’s Program Schedule.

Drop-in Tutoring for Tuesday:
10am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 100
1pm-2pm – FSN 101
2pm-4pm – MAT 232
4pm-5pm – MAT 228
5pm-7pm – CHY 122
7pm-8pm – PHY 112

Wednesday, March 19
Grad Fair 2014 is taking place today in the Memorial Union in front of the Bookstore from 10am-4pm. The annual Grad Fair provides an opportunity for future graduates to receive information concerning services and products relating to commencement day as well as post-commencement while getting their caps and gowns.

Drop-in Tutoring for Wednesday:
10am-11am – MAT 115
11am-12pm – BIO 208
12pm-2pm – BUA 202
4pm-5pm – PHY 122
5pm-7pm – PSY100

ML&C
1pm-2pm – Italian Table

Thursday, March 20
Drop-in Tutoring for Thursday:
11am-12pm – SOC 101
12pm-1pm – BIO 208
1pm-2pm – BIO 100
2pm-3pm – BIO 222
3pm-4pm – CHY 121

Friday, March 21
ML&C
2pm-3pm – Arabic Table

Sunday, March 23
Drop-in Tutoring for Sunday:
4pm-6pm MAT 228
6pm-8pm BIO 100

If other events turn up, we will be sure to update the calendar. Have a great week!